KSU Elementary Photography Class

October 11th Class

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Photographer reviews: Portrait Photographers

Steve McCurry

Sharbat Gula (literally “Rose Sherbet”)(born ca. 1972) is an Afghan woman of Pashtun ethnicity. She was forced to leave her home in Afghanistan during the Soviet war for a refugee camp in Pakistan where she was photographed by journalist Steve McCurry. The image brought her recognition when it was featured on the cover of the June 1985 issue of National Geographic Magazine, at a time when she was approximately 12 years old. Gula was known throughout the world simply as the Afghan Girl until she was formally identified in early 2002.

Gula was orphaned during the Soviet Union’s bombing of Afghanistan and sent to the Nasir Bagh refugee camp in Pakistan in 1984. Her village was attacked by Soviet helicopter gunships sometime in the early 1980s. The Soviet strike killed her parents – forcing her, her siblings and grandmother to hike over the mountains to the Nasir Bagh refugee camp in Pakistan.[1]

National_Geographic_cover

Before and after

Annie Leibovitz

Diane Arbus

Irving Penn

Gregory Heisler

Richard Avedon

Arnold Newman

“By exaggerating or minimizing his subjects’ surroundings, [Arnold Newman] crafted impressionistic gems… that suggested his sitters’ personalities,” wrote TIME magazine. He did, and the above photo, not notable in itself, is a product of such a mind.
Armanents manufacturer Alfred Krupp who alledgedly used slave labour to make weapons for the Nazis, contacted the famous Newman for a portrait in 1963. Upon finding out that Newman was a Jew, Krupp refused to let him make the photograph. Newman insisted to have Krupp look at his portfolio before making a final decision and after seeing Newman’s portfolio Krupp accepted. So on July 6, 1963, the industrialist and the auteur went into a delict factory in Essen which belonged to Krupp, where Newman decided to make Krupp look as evil as possible under the eerie demonic lighting of the factory.
When Krupp first saw the portrait he was livid. Newman was more tongue-in-cheek:  “As a Jew, it’s my own little moment of revenge.”

Further reading:

What makes a great portrait?

Hands on workshop:

Simple lighting

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Written by whhs84

October 10, 2010 at 8:40 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

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